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New Opportunity Continues Harmonious Life's Work

Michael Weinstein, MD

Dr. weinstein assists a patient with balance training as part of his rehabilitation.
Dr. weinstein assists a patient with balance training as part of his rehabilitation.
Michael Weinstein, MD, Medical Director of Eisenhower Medical Center’s new Inpatient Rehabilitation Center, has always loved the arts. While working in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, he also ran a clinic for performing artists.

“I always had season subscriptions to the symphony and ballet and enjoyed live performances, even though I was never particularly musically inclined myself,” says Dr. Weinstein. Interested in helping support performers, Dr. Weinstein pulled together a group of specialists with particular expertise in working with musicians, dancers and vocalists. He then approached the artist community, working with arts organizations, universities and colleges to support the development of the clinic. “We saw thousands of professionals and non-professionals over the years. I would take phone calls from various artists inquiring about our services and try to set them up with the most appropriate practitioner,” reflects Dr. Weinstein. “We treated artists throughout the Pacific Northwest and even had some come from international locations. I was with the clinic for 20 years, and I’m proud to say it’s still running.”

Still, after more than two successful decades as medical director for a number of programs that focused on inpatient rehabilitation, performing arts medicine, and neuromuscular problems, Dr. Weinstein was ready for a career change. “Starting an inpatient rehabilitation center at Eisenhower was exactly what I was looking for,” says Dr. Weinstein. “It was a unique opportunity to be in the early developmental stages of creating and providing a set of services that the region greatly needed. It also presented a tremendous professional challenge.”

“Starting an inpatient rehabilitation center at Eisenhower was exactly what I was looking for,”
—Dr. Weinstein

Dr. Weinstein was particularly attracted to Eisenhower’s Inpatient Rehabilitation Center because of its patient and outcome focus, as well as the program’s desire to provide a continuum of services for the patient, following their immediate medical and surgical care. The Center specializes in working with patients who have had strokes, complex orthopedic issues, and neurological and surgical concerns. “Most of the patients we work with have had catastrophic health issues — stroke, brain injury, spinal injury — no one would choose the illnesses that they are dealing with,” says Dr. Weinstein. “To be able to help them transition to a high quality of life from a disaster is tremendously gratifying.”

Originally from the Bay area, Dr. Weinstein enjoys his new home in Palm Springs. “I vacationed here a lot over the years. It was always a dream of mine to live here,” says Dr. Weinstein. When asked if he would consider heading up another performing arts clinic, Dr. Weinstein is optimistic. “Currently, all my efforts are focused on the rehabilitation center, and honestly, I’m loving every minute of the process. Still, I hope to take advantage of the arts scene in the Coachella Valley and Southern California soon. It is abundant and accessible. As for a clinic — there is always a possibility.”